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Mikhail Sholokhov - book author

Mikhail Aleksandrovich Sholokhov was awarded the 1965 Nobel Prize in Literature "for the artistic power and integrity with which, in his epic of the Don, he has given expression to a historic phase in the life of the Russian people."

Mikhail Sholokhov is the author of books: And Quiet Flows the Don, The Fate of a Man and Early Stories, Судьба Человека, Тихий Дон (Том #1), The Don Flows Home to the Sea, Vol 2, Virgin Soil Upturned, Book 2, Virgin Soil Upturned, Book 1, And Quiet Flows the Don, Vol 1 of 5, Tales of the Don, And Quiet Flows the Don, Vol 4 of 5

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01
And Quiet Flows the Don or Quietly Flows the Don (Тихий Дон, lit. "The Quiet Don") is 4-volume epic novel by Russian writer Mikhail Aleksandrovich Sholokhov. The 1st three volumes were written from 1925 to '32 & published in the Soviet magazine October in 1928–32. The 4th volume was finished in 1940. The English translation of the 1st three volumes appeared under this title in 1934. The novel is considered one of the most significant works of Russian literature in the 20th century. It depicts the lives & struggles of Don Cossacks during WWI, the Russian Revolution & Russian Civil War. In 1965, Sholokhov was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature for this novel. The authorship of the novel is contested by some literary critics & historians, who believe it wasn't entirely written by Sholokhov.
02
There is restraint and a trace of sadness in the way Mikhail Sholokov begins his story, as if to warn the reader that it is not an easy tale he has to tell. One postwar spring the author met a tall man with stooping shoulders and big rugged hands. And perhaps for the first and last time soldier Andrei Sokolov told a chance acquaintance the story of his life, told how he endured tortures and sufferings that would have broken many a man of weaker nature... But Sokolov's torn and wounded heart is still eager for life and eager to share life with his little Vanya, orphaned by the war like himself. Sholokov's The Fate of a Man ends on a stern note. Yet as one closes the book one believes that Andrei Sokolov will give all the strength of his generous Russian soul to his adopted son and that the boy will grow at his father's side into another man who can overcome any obstacle if his country calls upon him to do so.
06
In HARVEST ON THE DON, Mikhail Sholokhov continues the dramatic story of the impact of revolution on the people of his native Russia. IN AND QUIET FLOWS THE DON and THE DON FLOWS HOME TO THE SEA, Sholokhov tells of the violent and tumultuous days of the revolution and the civil war. In this novel we see the same Don village, Gremyachy Log, whose people have lived for generations according to medieval ritual, torn from the ancient ways. To Gremyachy Log has come Davidov, representative of the Party's drive to revolutionize village agriculture. The peasants see a vision of a better life in the plans of this man. Yet to-the-death opposition lurks just beneath the surface.
07
Mikhail Sholokhov is rightly considered both in his own country and abroad the foremost Soviet novelist of his generation.

Born in 1905, in a working Cossack family, Sholokhov's most impressionable years were those of the Russian Revolution and Civil War, which he had described with penetrating insight.

In 1926, he began his great epic of the Civil War And Quiet Flows the Don, and , to use his own words, “found himself” as a writer “in that arduous and joyful creative work”. And Quite Flows the Don was completed in 1940. The first book of Virgin Soil Upturned came out in 1932. The second was competed in 1960. In 1957 Sholokhov wrote a story, The Fate of a Man, which has become world famous. Also, he was working on They Fought for Their Country, a novel about Soviet people in the Second World War. Sholokhov is truly a writer of the people. His books have been printed in more than thirty-two million copies and translated into sixty-four languages.

Through the scene is set in a small Cossack village, Sholokhov's scope is no less great than in his other work, for the fate of his characters is the fate of a whole nation undergoing the greatest social revolution in its history.

A process of change had been set afoot that was to spread into every corner of Cossack life. Outworn traditions and habits were swept aside, personalities and ideas that had taken generations to form were either broken or made anew and all this in the face of bitter opposition from those who could not or would not change.

With a telling humanity Sholokhov depicts the faults and strivings, the suffering and laughter both of the fighters for progress with whom he himself has such deep ties, and their opponents.

This book has a fundamental message for those who wish to understand the stresses and strains of Soviet life from the 1930's to the present day.