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H. Irving Hancock - book author

Harrie Irving Hancock (1866?-1922) was an American chemist and writer, mainly remembered as an author of children's literature and juveniles in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and as having written a fictional depiction of a German invasion of the USA.

H. Irving Hancock is the author of books: Dave Darrin and the German Submarines Making a Clean-up of the Hun Sea Monsters, The Complete Kano Jiu-Jitsu, Dick Prescott's First Year at West Point, Dick Prescott's Second Year at West Point; Or, Findng the Glory of the Soldier's Life, The High School Freshmen; or, Dick & Co.'s First Year Pranks and Sports, Dick Prescott's Fourth Year at West Point, The High School Boys' Fishing Trip, The Motor Boat Club at Nantucket The Mystery of the Dunstan Heir, Dick Prescott's Third Year at West Point or Standing Firm for Flag and Honor, The Young Engineers in Colorado; or, At Railroad Building in Earnest

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Author Books

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Title
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01
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.
02
English-speaking readers cannot find a more complete study than this of the authentic form of judo developed in the nineteenth century by Professor Jiguro Kano. It explains and illustrates the entire system of 160 holds and throws and describes every important aspect, including pressure points, balance, and how to fall. 487 photographs and four charts
03
How do you feel, Dick! As spruce as you did an hour ago! Candidate Greg Holmes put the question with a half-nervous laugh. He spoke in a whisper, too, as if to keep his agitation from reaching the notice of any of the score or more of other young men in the room of Mr. Ward, the aged notary at West Point. "I'll be glad when I see some daylight through the proceedings," Dick Prescott whispered in answer. "I'm glad they allow us to talk here in undertones," pursued Greg. "If we weren't allowed to do so, some of us would go suddenly crazy, utter a whoop and spring through one of the windows," grinned Dick.
04
Leaving the road that wound by the officers' quarters at the north end, turning on to the road that passed the hotel, a hot, somewhat tired and rather dusty column of cadets swung along towards their tents in the distance. The column was under arms, as though the cadets had been engaged in target practice or out on a reconnaissance. The young men wore russet shoes, gray trousers and leggings, gray flannel shirts and soft campaign hats. Their appearance was not that of soldiers on parade, but of the grim toilers and fighters who serve in the field. Their work that morning had, in fact, been strictly in line with labor, for the young men, under Captain McAneny, had been engaged in the study of field fortifications. To be more exact, the young men had been digging military trenches - yes - digging them, for at West Point hard labor is not beneath the cadet's dignity.
05
"This series of stories, based on the actual doings of High School boys, teems with incidents in athletics and school-boy fun. The real Americanism of Dick Prescott and his chums will excite the admiration of every reader."
06
Work from the American chemist and writer, mainly remembered as an author of children's literature in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
07
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.
08
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.
10
"Look, Tom! There is a real westerner!" Harry Hazelton's eyes sparkled, his whole manner was one of intense interest. "Eh?" queried Tom Reade, turning around from his distant view of a sharp, towering peak of the Rockies. "There's the real thing in the way of a westerner," Harry Hazelton insisted in a voice in which there was some awe.