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Max Porter - book author

Max Porter’s first novel, Grief Is the Thing with Feathers won the Sunday Times/Peter, Fraser + Dunlop Young Writer of the Year, the International Dylan Thomas Prize, the Europese Literatuurprijs and the BAMB Readers’ Award and was shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award and the Goldsmiths Prize. It has been sold in twenty-nine territories. Complicité and Wayward’s production of Grief Is the Thing with Feathers directed by Enda Walsh and starring Cillian Murphy opened in Dublin in March 2018. Max lives in Bath with his family.

Max Porter is the author of books: Grief is the Thing with Feathers, Lanny, A Lick of Night: Excerpted from Grief is the Thing With Feathers, Grief is the Thing with Feathers, On Grief and Grieving, Mindset Carol Dweck, The Art of Happiness 10th Anniversary Edition 4 Books Collection Set, One Good Horse, THE DRAGON MAKER, The Life of A Horse Trader, The Horseman Returns, Eight Ghosts: The English Heritage Book of New Ghost Stories, Jerome's Study

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Author Books

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Title
Description
01
In a London flat, two young boys face the unbearable sadness of their mother's sudden death. Their father, a Ted Hughes scholar and scruffy romantic, imagines a future of well-meaning visitors and emptiness.

In this moment of despair they are visited by Crow - antagonist, trickster, healer, babysitter. This self-described sentimental bird is attracted to the grieving family and threatens to stay until they no longer need him. As weeks turn to months and physical pain of loss gives way to memories, this little unit of three begin to heal.

In this extraordinary debut - part novella, part polyphonic fable, part essay on grief, Max Porter's compassion and bravura style combine to dazzling effect. Full of unexpected humour and profound emotional truth, Grief is the Thing with Feathers marks the arrival of a thrilling new talent.
02
There’s a village sixty miles outside London. It’s no different from many other villages in England: one pub, one church, red-brick cottages, council cottages and a few bigger houses dotted about. Voices rise up, as they might do anywhere, speaking of loving and needing and working and dying and walking the dogs.

This village belongs to the people who live in it and to the people who lived in it hundreds of years ago. It belongs to England’s mysterious past and its confounding present. But it also belongs to Dead Papa Toothwort, a figure schoolchildren used to draw green and leafy, choked by tendrils growing out of his mouth.

Dead Papa Toothwort is awake. He is listening to this twenty-first-century village, to his English symphony. He is listening, intently, for a mischievous, enchanting boy whose parents have recently made the village their home. Lanny.
04
Please Note That The Following Individual Books As Per Original ISBN and Cover Image In this Listing shall be Dispatched Collectively:

Grief is the Thing with Feathers, On Grief and Grieving, Mindset Carol Dweck, The Art of Happiness 10th Anniversary Edition 4 Books Collection Set:

Grief is the Thing with Feathers:
In a London flat, two young boys face the unbearable sadness of their mother's sudden death. Their father, a Ted Hughes scholar and scruffy romantic, imagines a future of well-meaning visitors and emptiness.In this moment of despair they are visited by Crow - antagonist, trickster, healer, babysitter.

On Grief and Grieving:
One of the most important psychological studies of the late twentieth century,OnDeath and Dyinggrew out of Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's famous interdisciplinary seminar on death, life and transition. In this remarkable book, Dr. Kubler-Ross first explores the now-famous stages of death: denial and isolation, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.

Mindset Carol Dweck:
Dweck explains why it's not just our abilities and talent that bring us success-but whether we approach them with a fixed or growth mindset. She makes clear why praising intelligence and ability doesn't foster self-esteem and lead to accomplishment, but may actually jeopardize success.

The Art of Happiness 10th Anniversary Edition:
The Art of Happiness is a highly accessible guide for a western audience, combining the Dalai Lama's eastern spiritual tradition with Dr Howard C. Cutler's western perspective. Covering all key areas of human experience, they apply the principles of Tibetan Buddhism to everyday problems and reveal how one can find balance and complete spiritual and mental freedom.
05
This is the story of race horse trainer Buddy Miller and the one year that changed his life forever. Buddy will navigate through the daily rigors of his life on the race track, the murder of his college friend and moving to Kentucky to train some of the best horses he has ever had.Training racehorses is a tough profession. It takes a set of skills that not everyone possesses. It takes someone that is mentally tough enough to face defeat day in and day out because a trainer loses 80% of his races. It takes a person that is confident enough in his own abilities.
09
Rooted in place, slipping between worlds - a rich collection of unnerving ghosts and sinister histories.

Eight authors were given after hours freedom at their chosen English heritage site. Immersed in the history, atmosphere and rumours of hauntings, they channelled their darker imaginings into a series of extraordinary new ghost stories.

Sarah Perry's intense tale of possession at the Jacobean country house Audley End is a work of psychological terror, while Andrew Michael Hurley's story brings an unforgettably shocking slant to the history of Carlisle Castle. Within the walls of these historic buildings each author has found inspiration to deliver a new interpretation of the classic ghost story.
10
Test Centre is excited to announce the publication of Jerome’s Study, a collaboration between prize-winning author Max Porter and artist Catrin Morgan. The third publication in our ekphrastic series, the book explores the ways in which literary and visual art forms respond to and translate other works of art.

The collaboration evolved from Catrin’s series of isomorphic translations of Renaissance paintings of Saint Jerome, most often depicted at work in his study. Catrin invited Max to respond to her images, and his texts became the flesh to be re-inserted into the empty architectural environments of her art-historical spaces.

According to Max, ‘The idea was that they would be pan-historical, somewhere between polluted wall texts, hoax footnotes and the real (bodily) contemplations of a troubled theologian in a small space, battling myth and symbols and the small array of objects – real and imaginary – before and behind him. Cat asked me to spill over her clean lines, so the work is sometimes vulgar, sometimes kitsch (he is a saint, after all), but more often than not tragic, or pitiful. Men alone in boxes telling stories usually are.’

Jerome’s Study explores what happens when we observe and study pieces of art; how we depict and translate our impression of something, and the stories and preoccupations that emerge when we spend time with another work of art.

The book itself, beautifully designed and hand-assembled by Catrin, opens up and expands the possibilities inherent in the original collaboration, so that the radically engineered book itself is as important as the images and the text. As Max says, ‘This is what makes Jerome tick.’